February 23, 2024
Men and thyroid.

Men and thyroid.

Men and Thyroid

What You Need to Know About Men and Thyroid Problems and How to Treat Them

Did you know that men and thyroid is a problem.  Well, did you know your thyroid gland is one of the most important organs in your body?  It’s a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of your neck that produces hormones that regulate your metabolism, energy levels, mood, and many other functions.

But what happens when your thyroid gland doesn’t work properly?  You may develop thyroid problems that can affect your health and well-being. Thyroid problems are more common in women than in men, but men can also suffer from them. In fact, according to the American Thyroid Association, about 20 million Americans have some form of thyroid disease, and up to 60% of them are unaware of their condition!

Some of the common thyroid problems in men are hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and thyroid cancer.  Each of these conditions has different causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention strategies. In this article, we will provide you with information on everything you need to know about men and thyroid issues.

Hypothyroidism in Men

Hypothyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormones.  This can affect your body’s metabolism, energy levels, mood, and other functions.

Some of the common symptoms of hypothyroidism in men are as follows:

  • Fatigue.
  • Weight gain.
  • Depression.
  • Sensitivity to cold.
  • Dry skin and hair.
  • Muscle aches.
  • Low libido.
  • Erectile dysfunction.
  • Delayed ejaculation.

Some of the possible causes of hypothyroidism in men can be:

Men and thyroid.

  • Auto immune disease (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis), which is a condition where your immune system attacks your own thyroid gland.
  • Thyroid surgery or radiation therapy, which may damage or remove part or all of your thyroid gland.
  • Medications that interfere with thyroid function, are lithium, amiodarone, or interferon.
  • Iodine deficiency or excess, which may disrupt the production or utilization of thyroid hormones.

Hypothyroidism

Is diagnosed by measuring the levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T4) in your blood.  TSH is a hormone that signals your thyroid gland to produce more or less thyroid hormones.  T4 is one of the main thyroid hormones that regulates your metabolism.  If, your TSH level is high and your T4 level is low, it means that your thyroid gland is underactive and you have hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism

is treated by taking synthetic thyroid hormone pills (levothyroxine) to replace the missing hormones.  You will need to take these pills for the rest of your life to maintain a normal hormone level and avoid complications.  You will also need to have regular blood tests to monitor your hormone levels and adjust your dosage accordingly.

Here are some tips on how to manage hypothyroidism and improve your quality of life:

  • Eat a balanced diet that is rich in iodine, selenium, zinc, and other nutrients that support thyroid health.  Some good sources of these nutrients are seafood, eggs, dairy products, nuts, seeds, and whole grains.
  • Avoid foods that may interfere with thyroid function, such as soy, cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower), gluten (wheat, barley, rye), and processed foods.  These foods may contain substances that inhibit the absorption or conversion of thyroid hormones.
  • Exercise regularly to boost your metabolism, mood, and energy levels.  Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week.  You can do aerobic exercises (such as walking, jogging, cycling) or strength training (such as lifting weights or doing push-ups).
  • Get enough sleep and reduce stress levels.  Lack of sleep and chronic stress can worsen your symptoms and lower your immune system.  Try to get at least seven hours of quality sleep every night and practice relaxation techniques (such as deep breathing, meditation, or yoga).
  • Consult your doctor before taking any supplements or herbal remedies that may affect your thyroid function.  Some supplements (such as iodine) or herbs (such as kelp) may be beneficial for some people but harmful for others.  Always check with your doctor before trying anything new.

Hyperthyroidism in Men

Hyperthyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormones.  This can cause your body’s metabolism to speed up and affect your heart rate.  Your blood pressure, temperature, and other functions.

Some of the common symptoms of hyperthyroidism in men are:

  • Nervousness.
  • Weight loss.
  • Irritability.
  • Insomnia.
  • Tremors.
  • Palpitations.
  • Sweating.
  • Heat intolerance.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Gynecomastia. (male breast enlargement)
  • Low libido.
  • Erectile dysfunction.
  • Premature ejaculation.

Some of the possible causes of hyperthyroidism in men are:

Men and thyroid.

  • Auto immune disease (Graves’ disease).  Which is a condition where your immune system produces antibodies that stimulate your thyroid gland.  To produce more hormones.
  • Thyroid nodules or goitre (enlarged thyroid gland). Which may contain cells that produce excess hormones.
  • Thyroiditis (inflammation of the thyroid gland).  This may be caused by infection, medication, or other factors.
  • Excessive intake of iodine or thyroid hormones.  Which may be due to your diet, supplements, or medication.

Hyperthyroidism and it’s treatment.

Hyperthyroidism is diagnosed by measuring the levels of TSH and T4 in your blood.  As well as other tests such as thyroid scan, ultrasound, or biopsy to check for nodules or inflammation.  If, your TSH level is low and your T4 level is high.  It means that your thyroid gland is overactive and you have hyperthyroidism.

Hyperthyroidism is treated by using one or more of the following options:

  • Anti-thyroid drugs (methimazole or propylthiouracil) that block the production of thyroid hormones.  You will need to take these drugs for several months or years until your hormone levels normalize.  You will also need to have regular blood tests to monitor your hormone levels and adjust your dosage accordingly.
  • Radioactive iodine therapy that destroys the overactive thyroid cells with a dose of radioactive iodine taken orally or injected into your bloodstream.  This is a one-time treatment that may cure your hyperthyroidism permanently.  However, you may develop hypothyroidism as a result and need to take thyroid hormone pills for the rest of your life.
  • Surgery that removes part or all of your thyroid gland (thyroidectomy).  This is a last resort option that may be used if you have severe symptoms, large nodules, or cancer.  You will need to take thyroid hormone pills for the rest of your life after surgery.

Each treatment option has its own risks and side effects, and you will need to discuss them with your doctor.  Before making a decision.  You will also need life long monitoring and medication to prevent complications such as hypothyroidism or eye problems (Graves’ ophthalmopathy).

Men and Thyroid management tips

Here are some tips on how to manage hyperthyroidism and improve your quality of life:

Eat a balanced diet that is low in iodine, caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods that may worsen your symptoms.  Some foods that are high in iodine are seafood, dairy products, iodized salt, and seaweed.  Other foods that are high in caffeine are coffee, tea, chocolate, and energy drinks.  Some foods that are high in alcohol are beer, wine, liquor, and cocktails. Some foods that are high in spice are chili peppers, curry, mustard, and horseradish.

Avoid smoking and exposure to second hand smoke that may increase your risk of eye problems.  Smoking can also worsen your symptoms and interfere with your treatment.  If, you smoke, try to quit as soon as possible.  If, you don’t smoke, avoid being around people who do.

Exercise moderately to relieve stress and anxiety, but avoid strenuous activities that may increase your heart rate and blood pressure.  Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week.  You can do aerobic exercises (such as walking, jogging, cycling) or strength training (such as lifting weights or doing push-ups).  However, do not overdo it or push yourself beyond your limits.

Get enough rest and relaxation to cope with insomnia and irritability.  Lack of sleep and chronic stress can worsen your symptoms and lower your immune system.  Try to get at least seven hours of quality sleep every night and practice relaxation techniques (such as deep breathing, meditation, or yoga).

Consult your doctor before taking any supplements or herbal remedies that may affect your thyroid function.  Some supplements (such as iodine) or herbs (such as bugleweed) may be beneficial for some people, but harmful for others. Always check with your doctor before trying anything new.

Men and Thyroid Cancer in Men 

Thyroid cancer is a malignant growth of abnormal cells in the thyroid gland.  Men’s thyroid cancer is rare, but it is more aggressive and has a lower survival rate in men than in women.

Some of the common types of men and thyroid cancer are:

  • Papillary thyroid cancer, which is the most common and has the best prognosis.  It usually grows slowly and does not spread easily.
  • Follicular thyroid cancer, which is less common but more likely to spread to other parts of the body.  It usually grows faster and has a worse prognosis.
  • Medullary thyroid cancer, which is rare but can be inherited and produce excess hormones.  It usually grows slowly but can spread to other organs.
  • Anaplastic thyroid cancer, which is very rare but very aggressive and has a poor prognosis.  It usually grows rapidly and spreads widely.

Men and thyroid.

Some of the common symptoms of thyroid cancer in men are:

  • A lump or swelling in the neck.
  • Difficulty swallowing or breathing.
  • Hoarseness or change in voice.
  • Pain or pressure in the neck or throat.
  • Persistent cough or sore throat.

Men and Thyroid treatments

Some of the possible risk factors for men and thyroid cancer in men are:

Exposure to radiation, especially during childhood or adolescence.  Radiation can damage the DNA of the thyroid cells and cause mutations that lead to cancer.  Some sources of radiation are medical treatments (such as X-rays, CT scans, or radiotherapy), nuclear accidents (such as Chernobyl or Fukushima), or environmental exposure (such as radon gas or nuclear weapons testing).

Family history of thyroid cancer or genetic mutations.  Some people inherit a higher risk of developing thyroid cancer from their parents or relatives.  Some genetic conditions that increase the risk of thyroid cancer are familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).

Chronic thyroiditis or goitre.  Thyroiditis is inflammation of the thyroid gland, which may be caused by infection, medication, or other factors.  Goitre is enlargement of the thyroid gland, which may be caused by iodine deficiency, autoimmune disease, or other factors. Both conditions can increase the risk of developing nodules or abnormal cells in the thyroid gland.

Older age (over 40).  The risk of thyroid cancer increases with age, as the cells accumulate more damage and mutations over time.

Men and Thyroid cancer is diagnosed by using one or more of the following tests:

Keeping healthy with exercise

Physical examination and medical history.  Your doctor will check your neck for any lumps, swelling, or changes in your voice. Your doctor will also ask you about your symptoms, family history, and exposure to radiation.

Blood tests to measure the levels of thyroid hormones and calcitonin (a hormone produced by medullary thyroid cancer). These tests can help determine if your thyroid gland is functioning normally or if there is any sign of hormone imbalance or excess production.

Ultrasound to visualize the thyroid gland and detect any nodules or abnormalities. Ultrasound uses sound waves to create images of your internal organs. It is a painless and non-invasive procedure that can help diagnose the size, shape, and location of the thyroid nodules.

Fine needle aspiration biopsy to collect a sample of cells from the suspicious nodule and examine them under a microscope.  This is a minimally invasive procedure that involves inserting a thin needle into the nodule and withdrawing some cells for analysis.  It can help determine if the nodule is benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

  • Molecular testing to identify any genetic mutations or markers that may indicate the type and aggressiveness of the cancer.  This is a laboratory test that analyses the DNA or RNA of the tumour cells for any abnormalities that may affect their growth and behaviour.  It can help guide the treatment and prognosis of the cancer.

Understanding Men and Thyroid problems

Thyroid cancer is treated by using one or more of the following options:

Surgery to remove part or all of your thyroid gland (thyroidectomy) and any affected lymph nodes (neck dissection). This is the main treatment option for most types of thyroid cancer.  It can cure your cancer if it has not spread to other parts of your body.  You will need to take thyroid hormone pills for the rest of your life after surgery to replace the missing hormones.

Radioactive iodine therapy to destroy any remaining cancer cells after surgery.  This is a one-time treatment that involves taking a pill or liquid that contains radioactive iodine.  The iodine is absorbed by your thyroid cells and emits radiation that kills them.  This can prevent recurrence or metastasis of the cancer. However, you may develop hypothyroidism as a result and need to take thyroid hormone pills for the rest of your life.

External beam radiation therapy to target the tumour or metastatic sites with high-energy rays.  This is a treatment option that uses a machine that delivers radiation beams to specific areas of your body where the cancer cells are located.  It can shrink the tumour, relieve symptoms, and prevent further spread of the cancer.  However, it may also damage healthy tissues and cause side effects such as skin irritation, hair loss, nausea, fatigue, or dry mouth.

Ways of treating cancer.

Chemotherapy to kill the cancer cells with drugs that are given orally or intravenously.  This is a treatment option that uses drugs that interfere with the growth and division of the cancer cells.  It can slow down or stop the progression of the cancer. However.  It may also affect normal cells and cause side effects such as hair loss, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, fatigue, infection, or bleeding.

Targeted therapy to block the growth and spread of the cancer cells with drugs that target specific molecules or pathways involved in the cancer development.  This is a treatment option that uses drugs that bind to or inhibit certain proteins or genes that are essential for the survival of the cancer cells.  It can stop or slow down the growth of the cancer without harming normal cells.   However, it may also cause side effects such as rash, diarrhoea, liver problems, or high blood pressure.

Living with hyperthyroidism

Each treatment option has its own benefits and risks, and you will need to discuss them with your doctor before making a decision.  You will also need follow-up care and monitoring to check for recurrence or metastasis of the cancer.  As, well as to manage any side effects or complications of the treatment.  Such as hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, nerve damage, or infection.

Here are some tips on how to cope with thyroid cancer and improve your quality of life:

Seek emotional support from family, friends, counsellors, or support groups.  Having thyroid cancer can be a stressful and challenging experience.  You may feel scared, angry, sad, or lonely.  You may also have questions, doubts, or worries about your condition and treatment.

Men and thyroid.

It is important to share your feelings and thoughts with someone who can listen and understand.  You can also join a support group of people who have gone through or are going through the same situation. You can find support groups online or in your local community through organizations such as the Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association.

Learn about the disease and treatment options and ask questions to your health care team.  Having thyroid cancer can be confusing and overwhelming. You may not know what to expect or what to do.  It is important to educate yourself about your condition and treatment options and ask questions to your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.  They can provide you with reliable information and advice that can help you make informed decisions and cope better with your situation.

Learning from the experts

Take care of your physical health by eating a nutritious diet, staying hydrated, exercising regularly, and avoiding smoking and alcohol. Having thyroid cancer can affect your physical health and well-being.  You may experience symptoms such as fatigue, weight loss or gain, pain, or nausea.

You may also have side effects from the treatment such as hair loss, dry skin, or infection.  It is important to take care of your body by eating a balanced diet that provides you with enough calories, protein, vitamins, minerals, and fluids.  You should also avoid foods that may irritate your throat or stomach, such as spicy, acidic, or hard foods.   I would also suggest you should also drink plenty of water to keep yourself hydrated and prevent dehydration.

Take plenty of exercise regularly to maintain your muscle strength, bone density, blood circulation, and mood.  You should avoid smoking and alcohol that may worsen your symptoms or interfere with your treatment.  Be aware of how to manage men and thyroid problems.

Take care of your mental health by managing stress, anxiety, depression, and fatigue with relaxation techniques, hobbies, meditation, or therapy.  Having thyroid cancer can affect your mental health and well-being. You may experience stress, anxiety, depression, or fatigue that can interfere with your daily activities and quality of life. 

It is important to take care of your mind by managing these emotions and feelings with relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, or yoga.  You can also engage in hobbies or activities that make you happy and relaxed such as reading, listening to music, gardening, or painting.  You can also seek professional help if you experience any signs of distress such as suicidal thoughts, hopelessness, or loss of interest in daily activities.

My Conclusion About Men And Thyroid

Men and thyroid problems in men are not uncommon and can have serious consequences if left untreated.  They can affect your physical and mental health and well-being.  Therefore, it is important to be aware of your thyroid health and seek medical attention if you notice any signs or symptoms of thyroid problems.

In this article, we have provided you with information on the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and thyroid cancer in men.  We hope that this article has helped you understand more about men and thyroid issues and how to deal with them.

If, you have any questions or concerns about your thyroid health or treatment options please consult your doctor for further guidance.  Please share with anyone you care about.

For more information and support about men and thyroid or thyroid problems in men, you can visit the following resources.

  • The American Thyroid Association.
  • Learn from “The Thyroid Foundation of America”.
  • The Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association.

To your health ultimatetraininggear.com.

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